Promoting Book 1, Writing Book 2 and A One Star Review

Writer Babble

Blank notepad over laptop and coffee cup on office wooden table

Okay to start with I’m still having an awesome time floating around the sea of self publishing. It’s a wonderful place to be but has it’s ups and down like everything else we do in life.

First to promoting book 1. I’ve found some really good places to promote The Vanishing. Bknights, who came to me as a recommendation from other writers was great. The result was nice and again were a very easy place to do business with. Pixelscroll were just okay. I sold some but not a lot for the price I paid for them.
Overall though the book has been within the top 20 and top 50 in it’s categories which I’ve been incredibly happy about. The enigmatic Amazon algorithms Gods have picked it up and advertising it here and there.
I also did an Author interview with R J Madigan over on her blog. If you…

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The Top Ten Self-Publishing, Fantasy, and eBook Stories of 2014

Jennifer Bresnick

Victorian clock face

Hey there, guys!  I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas (or at least a brief break from work/commuter traffic/annoying office mates, for those who didn’t celebrate).  I don’t want to distract you from composing your reviews of Dark the Night Descending, which I know you’re all doing in the final two weeks of my contest, but I thought I’d share with you an end-of-the-year roundup of the top posts on Inkless.  2014 was a good year for my humble little blog, and I think it’s kind of fun to revisit the stories that attracted the most eyeballs over the past twelve months.

Ready to count down?  Here we go!

10. Short Story: He Belongs to the Sea

It was nightfall when the blood came.  William had been set to sitting and watching, so the surgeon could attend to others.  He had never seen so much before.  The…

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Writer to Writer by Gail Carson Levine

The Online Eccentric Librarian

This is a wonderful, well written, friendly, and very informative guide to writing. Although ostensibly written for older kids (e.g., teens), there is so much great information in here as to be an invaluable resource for anyone interested in – or who loves – the craft of writing. The focus is purely on all aspects of a story, from making characters sympathetic to setting and dialogue. But more importantly, the book is liberally sprinkled with very good advice from a beloved published author who drew upon the most asked questions on her blog for the foundation of this title.

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The book breaks down as follows: Section One: Being a writer (writer’s’ advice column, the spark, drops of blood); Section Two: Character Building (the depths, character cogitation, fear of flat, use your words, the outward show, here we are); Section Three: Character Nitty Gritty (like me!, to change or not to…

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Guest Post: Laurie’s Thoughts and Reviews

J B Glazer

typewriter and wine

It’s been quite a day. I had two book tour stops, a work event, a standing room only train ride home from the city, and my son just had the biggest meltdown since, well, ever. And to be honest I don’t even really know what it was about. I don’t think he does either. So I’m ready to kick back and relax. And the way I do that best is by writing. I’m off to think up some new material. And perhaps have a drink, or two. In the meantime, check out my interview with Laurie Jenkins: tour stop #1.

Tell us about your current release.
My book is a contemporary romance about two coworkers who struggle to suppress their intense attraction in their pursuit of climbing the corporate ladder. My protagonist, Lexi Winters, always has played by the rules to get what she wants, but when she meets coworker Jake…

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Book Review: Crafting the Character Arc by Jennie Jarvis

Read Tom Lucas

jarviscover

A quick Google search for writing advice will result in approximately 7 billion hits. That’s a craft article for every person on the planet. There is more writing about writing on the Internet than there is actual writing. Some of this advice is good, some bad, and some – I’m pretty sure was put there by highly competitive writers that are hoping you will follow it so that your writing will SUCK FOREVER.

Something one hears often is that characters should be engaging, relatable, and must change over the course of the story. It’s obvious advice. But unless you are already a pro, how to pull this off might not be so obvious. And if you’re a pro, you probably don’t need the advice in the first place – but thanks for reading my book review anyway. You’re a peach!

If you are looking to create a path for your…

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The Well-Read Naturalist reviews Collared

Notes from the Dry Side

CollaredJohn E. Riutta reviewed Collared on The Well Read Naturalist book review this week. In his summary of the book, Riutta wrote:

Collared is not only about wolves but people as well; people with astonishingly different views of the world in which they live, who are honestly trying to work together for their own as well as the common good of their families, towns, and the larger society, to establish a set of rules under which they all – and the wolves as well – can live together with a minimal amount of disruption to their respective ways of life.
To see the full review, and to find recommendations for other books within the genre, please check out, The Well-Read Naturalist.

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Catherine Brady’s Story Logic and the Craft of Fiction

Julaina Kleist-Corwin

Story LogicA couple years ago, Catherine Brady spoke at the California Writers Club, Tri-Valley Branch meeting. She impressed me and I bought her book, Story Logic and the Craft of Fiction. I highly recommend it as an indepth study for the craft of writing. Brady is the author of three story collections. Her Curled in the Bed of Love won the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and The Mechanics of Falling was a winner of the Northern California Book Award for Fiction. She teaches on the MFA in the Writing Program at the University of San Francisco.

In the writing class I  teach, we finished Wired for Story by Lisa Cron as a class text. I recommended  we use Brady’s book next and the members agreed. I’m looking forward to reading it again. Each page is a jewel of wisdom.

For example on Page Five, Brady states, “Plot is…

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On Reviews For Authors

Jason Cordova's Website

So at a very odd hour late last night, I went ahead and wrote a review over at Shiny Book Review. To say that it was an adventure is an understatement. Reputedly, this author has a history of lashing out at reviewers, so we’ll see just how interesting things get around here.

I mentioned elsewhere that the ideal author response to any review is a “thank you for writing a review”. That should be it. Drop mic, exit stage left, fade to black. For some reason some authors feel the need to tell the reviewer that what they read was not what was written, and they missed subtle nuances, etc. Word of advice: if the reviewer missed it, then it’s possible it wasn’t there in the first place.

Nobody knows the story and the characters as well as the author, and it’s completely understandable to see something that the…

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