Divorcing the Writer From the Editor

William Drayman

I realize that the secret to a good blog is posting often, but circumstances at the moment dictate my writing time take a back seat to my children’s schooling requirements. I am writing from 9pm to 1am or so, and there is so much work to do with The Road Out that I simply cannot spare much time for blogging.

However, the holidays have started, so I have more time available for sitting in front of the keyboard right now.

So, I wanted to talk about what I have learned as regards editing. Not the mechanics per se, but the mental attitude that has to be donned to edit a book successfully. As you can discern by the title, the writer mindset does not get on well with the editing mentality.

The writer spends many an hour crafting a chapter to encapsulate beautiful prose. The creative juices flow and the…

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Guest Post by Alex Hurst: What Can Traditional Publishing Offer Authors?

Nicholas C. Rossis

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Alex Hurst

As you know, I’ve self-published some of my books, and published traditionally others. When I posted a (somewhat cheeky) infographic about Self-publishing vs. Traditional Publishing, my friend Alex Hurst pointed out that there’s lot more to be gained from following the traditional path than suggested by the post.

After she had made a few great arguments in the comments, I asked her to write up a guest post on the subject, as she had obviously put a lot of thought into the subject. She came up with the great post below. Enjoy!

3 Reasons to Go Traditional

These days, self-publishing is all the rage, and with the prominence of DIY publishers like Amazon, Smashwords, and Draft-2-Digital, it’s not hard to see why. Authors can take full control of the creative process, editing only what they want to, choosing (or making) a cover they feel presents their book faithfully, and distributing to whatever…

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Promoting Book 1, Writing Book 2 and A One Star Review

Writer Babble

Blank notepad over laptop and coffee cup on office wooden table

Okay to start with I’m still having an awesome time floating around the sea of self publishing. It’s a wonderful place to be but has it’s ups and down like everything else we do in life.

First to promoting book 1. I’ve found some really good places to promote The Vanishing. Bknights, who came to me as a recommendation from other writers was great. The result was nice and again were a very easy place to do business with. Pixelscroll were just okay. I sold some but not a lot for the price I paid for them.
Overall though the book has been within the top 20 and top 50 in it’s categories which I’ve been incredibly happy about. The enigmatic Amazon algorithms Gods have picked it up and advertising it here and there.
I also did an Author interview with R J Madigan over on her blog. If you…

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One Indie Author’s Debut Year Income

Jessi Gage...A Time to Love

The Numbers Are In!

About a year ago, I compared royalties for traditional versus indie publishing in a blog post. I had a unique perspective to offer since I did this comparison for the SAME book and close to the same month of different years, an opportunity afforded to me when the traditional small-press publisher I was with changed hands and gave authors the chance to ask for their rights back.

View the post here to see what I made in January 2013 as a traditionally published author versus what I made on the same book in February 2014 as an indie author (both were debut months). At the end of the post, I suggest I might do a similar comparison for a full year of traditional publishing versus indie publishing.

Well, here I am to do just that! Thanks for stopping by to peek! If you’re new to…

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The Top Ten Self-Publishing, Fantasy, and eBook Stories of 2014

Jennifer Bresnick

Victorian clock face

Hey there, guys!  I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas (or at least a brief break from work/commuter traffic/annoying office mates, for those who didn’t celebrate).  I don’t want to distract you from composing your reviews of Dark the Night Descending, which I know you’re all doing in the final two weeks of my contest, but I thought I’d share with you an end-of-the-year roundup of the top posts on Inkless.  2014 was a good year for my humble little blog, and I think it’s kind of fun to revisit the stories that attracted the most eyeballs over the past twelve months.

Ready to count down?  Here we go!

10. Short Story: He Belongs to the Sea

It was nightfall when the blood came.  William had been set to sitting and watching, so the surgeon could attend to others.  He had never seen so much before.  The…

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Yes, Agents Google Writers

Carly Watters, Literary Agent Blog

readingelephant-vi.sualize.us This is the social media elephant in the room.

You don’t query in a vacuum. If you write a query letter and an agent is intrigued (congratulations!) the next thing an agent does is Google you or click on the links in your signature to see where it takes us.

A writer’s virtual footprint is their resume at that point.

Here are my ‘online guidelines’ for writers:

  • Make sure you have a landing page. It could be Tumblr, WordPress, About.me or a website. You only need one, but make sure you have one that has good SEO–Wordpress or a domain name is best for that.
  • Make sure you’re not a digital ghost. If we Google you and nothing comes up it makes us think 1) you don’t take this seriously and 2) that you don’t understand social media and the importance of an online presence and that worries us. It’s a red…

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Indie Authors: Where Are They Now? (Part 4)

Carol Ervin's Author Site

Oh, horrors!  I’m saying this up front to give you the option to ignore/delete this post right now—or devour it, depending on your taste.

Reading on? Okay, here we go.

Harvey Click is the only one of John L. Monk’s awesome indies that I have not been able to read. Well, I did read the opening chapters of Demon Frenzy, which Click says is mild in comparison to The Bad Box. But I’m squeamish, the kind of person who hides in the lobby in a theatre or leaves the TV room when a movie gets too intense.bad_box

So to do justice to this fine indie author, I’m telling you what other people have said about his work.

“Extraordinarily talented writer,” said blogger and book reviewer Carol Kean, who confessed she had to skim some of the most horrific descriptions in Demon Frenzy. And remember, this…

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The bittersweet taste of traditional publishing

Writer's Block

book-436507_640One of the many reasons I have been more than usually absent from this blog in recent months is a rather large side project – a non fiction book. Now that we are in the final stages of reviewing the contract with the publisher, I think it may be worth adding my two-bobs worth to the discussion about self publishing vs. traditional publishing.

The new book, which will be about playspaces, came about in the most unlikely of ways. A chance in a million. On a whim, back in the dim dark days at the start of the year, I entered a competition on Goodreads. Remarkably, I won it, and some time later received a lovely hardback edition of a landscape design history book. Finding it hard to maintain the CPD points I need to maintain my qualification with a bub, I inquired of our professional magazine if they would…

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Writing Contests…

So Long Suburbia...

The very first slot machine I ever played did not win anything. Even in that disappointing moment I felt the universal sagacity in this.   As everyone knows, if you win the first time you’re hooked.

This is why I see all writing contests through a filter of rosy glass, because I won second place in the first one I ever entered. In all fairness the contest was made for me.  The Young Adult category only asked for the first chapter to be submitted.  And I am excellent at first chapters.  I’ve been writing stellar first chapters since middle school.  I have more first chapters than stains on my white couch, and I have three kids.

I won a cash prize, one hundred dollars, and a letter that offered congratulations. The letter, which I still have somewhere, says something like, “This contest was formed to encourage unpublished writers to continue in…

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How can you help?

jean's writing

What is the difference between an Alpha Reader, Beta Reader or Critique Partner?

How can you help a writer?working from home, laptop with mug by a window

Do you read a lot?

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 31:  Employee Tilly Shi...

Do you have an opinion?

Then you have a lot to offer a writer and here's how.

Writers need feedback before a manuscript is completed. A reader is invaluable to a writer and even if you’re not a writer, you have an opinion.

Readers can provide all or just some of the critique points. Also, while they will discuss some of the good things they like about the story, the goal is to have a reader you trust that’s completely honest. One who is willing to point out problems and say “hey, this does not work for me.”

The Alpha Reader

  •  An alpha reader can be anyone who enjoys reading, and doesn’t need to be a writer.
  • Alpha readers look at the big picture, help through roadblocks, and prod the writer so they…

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SYNOPSIS MAGIC

Author Biz Blog

message in a bottle

What makes a good synopsis?

How is a synopsis used and by whom?

What’s the most efficient way to “build it”?

Most writers agree that writing the whole novel is easier than writing the synopsis for the novel. But it doesn’t have to be this hard. Once you understand who uses it and how, you can get your arms around it.

The synopsis is a selling tool—traditionally for the writer to an agent, then agent to editors, editors to colleagues in-house, and to varying extents for use in the copy writing for your book. Indie publishers use the synopsis for creating short blurbs about the book online, marketing copy, press releases, and the like.

The synopsis has a lot of jobs to do because outside of the agent and editor, most other people involved in marketing or selling the book will never get to read the actual book. Even if they do…

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The Scary Query

Katrina Anne Willis, Author

Parting Gifts

Like most human beings, we have a great deal going on in our lives right now. Some things I can write about, others not so much.

But here’s something: I just returned from a glorious week at the 2014 Heartland Film Festival in Indiana where I always come home inspired and renewed. So inspired, in fact, that this morning, I finally did it. I finally hit “send” on my first query letter for my new novel, PARTING GIFTS.

I never imagined clicking a button could be so hard.

Releasing your words to the world after four years of writing and rewriting and crying and rewriting again leaves you feeling vulnerable and open… and best of all, excited. There is a great deal of possibility out there.

For those of you who enjoy contemporary fiction, I’d like to give you a little taste.

Here’s a quick synopsis:

PARTING GIFTS is the…

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