SYNOPSIS MAGIC

Author Biz Blog

message in a bottle

What makes a good synopsis?

How is a synopsis used and by whom?

What’s the most efficient way to “build it”?

Most writers agree that writing the whole novel is easier than writing the synopsis for the novel. But it doesn’t have to be this hard. Once you understand who uses it and how, you can get your arms around it.

The synopsis is a selling tool—traditionally for the writer to an agent, then agent to editors, editors to colleagues in-house, and to varying extents for use in the copy writing for your book. Indie publishers use the synopsis for creating short blurbs about the book online, marketing copy, press releases, and the like.

The synopsis has a lot of jobs to do because outside of the agent and editor, most other people involved in marketing or selling the book will never get to read the actual book. Even if they do…

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Synopsis Hell: Writing a Synopsis for Query Letters

Kassie Berg

I’ve been querying like mad over the past couple weeks.

For those that don’t know what querying is, it’s basically sending a letter/other materials to an agent to inquire as to whether they’re interested in reading your manuscript.

Through time spent researching various literary agent preferences I’ve found that no two queries look exactly alike. Some agents only want a query letter. Some want a query letter and the first ten pages. Some only want the first ten pages. Some want the first ten pages in the body of the email. Some want it as an attachment. Some want it mailed. And, unfortunately, some want a synopsis.

These synopsis-seeking agents are the bane of my existence.

Believe it or not, I think I may have had a harder time summarizing the plot of my book in two Word doc. pages than I had writing the entire two hundred sixty book…

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